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Author: csteiger

New Television Show

 

I’m happy to announce my involvement in a new true crime television show that will start taping in the fall along with Dr. Lee Mellor and Suzanna Ryan. It’s called Relentless. We’ll be looking into cold case murders from across the country and try to solve them using advanced forensic testing at no cost to the submitting agency.
Every day cold case murders are solved that were thought to be unsolvable. Thousands of cases are sitting on a shelf in a police station right now that could be solved if the latest techniques were applied, but agencies are understaffed and underfunded. We’re here to get you past that point. If your agency has a case you think could benefit at no cost to you, contact us.

 

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Joel

In my last few years working Homicide at police headquarters there was a janitor that worked our floor in the evening. His name was Joel.
Joel was mentally delayed. It was a result of being assaulted by his brother, who struck him in the head with a weapon causing brain damage.
Prior to that, Joel was enrolled in a Culinary Arts program with dreams of becoming a chef.
Joel loved working the seventh floor of police headquarters, where the Homicide Unit is housed. Everyone in Homicide treated him with kindness. He called us all his buddies.
Joel was very meticulous in his routine. He did everything in order and did everything well.
At one point several years ago, the powers that be changed which floors their employees were to work on, and Joel was removed from the seventh floor.
He was inconsolable, crying that he wanted to work with his “buddies”.
Several of us emailed his supervisors.
“What the hell are you thinking?” we asked. “Put Joel back on the seventh floor.”
After a week or so, they did just that.
Joel was elated.
Joel would show up about three in the afternoon every day.
“Joel,” I asked him. “What time does your shift start?”
“Four-thirty,” he said.
“Why do you get here so early?” I asked.
“I don’t want to be late,” he said.
One day I asked him, “Joel, are you enrolled in Deferred Compensation?” It’s the government’s answer to a 401k.
“I don’t know what that is,” he said.
I made an appointment with him to meet with an advisor and sign up.
A few months later, I asked him how that was going.
“It’s really good!” he said. “I have a lot of money!”
Joel had never taken a sick day in his entire time working for the city. One day he showed up for work, obviously sick.
Joel took a bus in and took another home at one o’clock in the morning.
“You need to go home,” I told him.
I found out he had almost six months of sick time built up. I drove him home.
About a year before I retired, Joel came up to me.
“My brother died,” he said, referring to the brother who had assaulted him.
“Even though he hurt me,” he said, “I still love him.”
I learned a lot from Joel. About what’s important in life, and about forgiveness.
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Serial Killers prefer Matts

When my partner Mike Ciesynski and I were investigating murders by serial killer Dewayne Lee Harris, we took him out on “field trips” where he would tell us about murders he committed. When we did, we would stop at Matt’s Hotdogs in Georgetown to feed him. He loved the place.
Four out of five serial killers prefer Matts.

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American Detective with Joe Kenda

I’m on an episode of the new show, American Detective with Joe Kenda, which premiered on the Discovery Plus streaming network on January 4.   The episode of called Murder, Murder, Murder and it’s about the DeWayne Lee Harris serial murder case I investigated several years ago.

The episode will also air on Investigation Discovery sometime this Spring.

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Confession

Someone’s about to confess to a murder.

James Williams was a psychotic killer who murdered Shannon Harps as a random victim after she walked past him on a sidewalk returning from a grocery store.  She didn’t see him fall in behind her as she passed.  He followed her to her Capitol Hill apartment and stabbed her to death on New Year’s Eve.

After a week of long hours tracking down leads, we identified Williams as the killer.  We brought him in for an interrogation that lasted more than two hours before he finally confessed to the crime.  He pled guilty to the murder.

The case is chronicled in a chapter of my first book, “Homicide: The View from Inside the Yellow Tape.”

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